High School Performances

Ask Hatshepsut

Unique perspective of ancient Egypt from a unique Pharaoh. Hatshepsut, the fifth Pharaoh of the eighteenth dynasty of Egypt. She ruled for 15 years over the most powerful civilisation in history. Her name meant Foremost of Noble Ladies. But how did this remarkable woman achieve power in a masculine society? A society where all life issues from the male God Amen-Ra. A society where power should pass from father to son. Meet Hatshepsut as she tells the story of her life: Becoming ruler. Maintaining control. Thriving in a highly organised bureaucratic system. Embarking on the largest building projects ever seen. (Almost every museum in the world has a relic of Hatshepsut’s reign).The first Pharaoh to form a full-time professional army.
Students will gain an understanding of life in ancient Egypt and the interwoven layers of religion, politics and administration that created the empire of this great Queen.

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Flowers for Algeron

Charlie Gordon, a mentally handicapped, good-natured and trusting individual, finds his simple life changing unexpectedly. After an operation on a little white mouse named Algernon, Charlie is selected to be the first human to undergo experimental surgery to increase his intelligence. As Charlie’s intelligence develops his emotions are thrown into turmoil – with greater awareness he suffers extremes of insecurity and paranoia. The experiment ultimately turns out to be flawed and, as Algernon regresses and dies, Charlie witnesses his own potential fate. The story is told in Charlie’s words – from his diary – enabling the audience to feel Charlie’s warmth, compassion, humour and turmoil. The story explores the nature of intelligence, the consequences of attempting to surgically alter humanity and our own respect, or lack of it, for difference. Flowers for Algernon is a poignant, sensitive and unforgettable story. Daniel Keyes’ novel, Flowers for Algernon, is one of the best science-fiction stories of our time. Published in 1959, it was hailed as a classic of the genre. It won the Science Fiction Writers’ of America Hugo Award in 1960, & the SWFA Nebula Award in 1966. In 1968 Cliff Robertson won an academy award for his portrayal in the adaptation titled – Charlie.

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The Cyber Bully

Zoe and her cousin Edward have a lot of time on their hands. They are always online. One day Zoe discovers she can torment the girls she doesn’t like in her class using her favourite social networking sites and her mobile phone. She and Edward let loose thinking its harmless fun. Neither realises the impact of their actions. Things get a little crazy and Zoe starts suffering text-iety, post traumatic texting disorder not to mention post text depression. Edward and Zoe enter a cyber war and eventually bear the consequences of their actions.
The Cyber Bully is an entertaining play that explores the serious issue of cyber bullying among young people. The play looks at the misuse of texting, social networking sites and unauthorized use of pictures and footage. There will be a de-brief session offered after the performance where the actors will address important issues that are raised during the play and occur due to cyber bullying.

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Techno Bully

Kathy is the new girl at Crono Beach High and shortly after she arrives finds herself being bullied via text messaging and social networking sites. Kathy finds it impossible to protect herself from cyber bullying as she knows nothing about it. A male student befriends her but can Kathy trust him? He seems sympathetic but Kathy doesn’t know what to do or who to trust in this very new kind of situation.
Kathy’s dilemma enables an exploration of cyber bullying. The play exposes the misuse of new technologies and offers strong, positive strategies to deal with this growing problem. Actors also offer an informal and friendly debrief session after the play.

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Sister Mary of the Cross

Mary MacKillop dedicated her life to the creation of an independent order of nuns free to serve and educate the poor throughout Australia and New Zealand. An order, independent of bishops, and controlled by a Mother General.
The play unveils Mary MacKillop’s determination – political, practical and spiritual – to fulfil her dream; collaborating with Father Woods, building a school in Penola, battling for independence, her excommunication, the glorious blessing of the Pope and despite unyielding illness the foundation of The Sisters of Saint Joseph. The play, one hour long with two actors, is adapted from primary source material and includes many of the thoughts and feelings of Mary MacKillop. It is an excellent resource on pioneers, women in society, religious studies and the history of the Catholic Church in Australia.

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Catherine McAuley's Mercy

Sisters of Mercy all around the world draw inspiration from Catherine McAuley, who founded the Sisters of Mercy in Ireland in 1831. Catherine’s words – “It began with 2, Sister Doyle and I” – speak of the humble beginning to what has now become an international association of Sisters of Mercy. The play explores Catherine McAuley’s determination – political, practical and spiritual – to fulfil her dream of educating the poor, in particular women and girls. Catherine McAuley had a strong and dynamic character as well as a disarming Irish humour to help her through the trials that came her way. Will you tell the Sisters to get a good cup of tea…when I am gone and to comfort one another. – Letter of Mary Vincent Whitty to Cecilia Marmion in Sullivan, Catherine McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy, p. 243

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Shakespeare's Women

‘Come, you spirits
That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here,
And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full
Of direst cruelty. Make thick my blood…’
Lady Macbeth howls to the spirits of the underworld to make thick her blood & steel her soul ‘gainst murder.
She is one of the many lively dames brought to life in this 55 minute, two-woman play. A perfect introduction for years 7 & 8 and great fun for 9 & 10.
Some of the women dramatised include:
o Titania Queen of the Fairies – under the spell of a love potion she seduces a donkey to her bower!
o Cleopatra torments a poor messenger who brings her news she does not like! Antony’s marriage to someone else. Talk about shooting the messenger.
o Lady Macbeth invokes the spirits & seduces her husband to murder. The original power couple.
o Helena won’t let Demetrius go – literally! She grabs his legs and he drags her through the forest attempting to escape: ‘I’ll run from thee and hide me in the brakes, and leave thee to the mercy of wild beasts.’ Tut tut Demetrius that’s no way to speak to a young woman in love.
o Ophelia, unable to comprehend Hamlet’s violence toward her; slowly loses her mind. Swaddled in rosemary & thyme she sinks to a watery grave.
‘When down her weedy trophies and herself Fell in the weeping brook. Her clothes spread wide; And, mermaid-like, awhile they bore her up.’

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Primary School Performances

Bully no more

Bully no more is part 1 in the anti – bullying trilogy. Bully No More dramatises a troubled friendship between two students at primary school. Eric can’t understand why he is always being picked on by Becksy at lunch time. He confides in his good friend Ralph who gives him a few home truths and some great advice. He sets out to discover why Becksy treats him the way she does. As Eric begins to understand what is making Becksy act the way she does he discovers that he and Ralph can help her through peer support and friendship. They discover they can be friends after all. The play dramatises what bullying is; physical, verbal, visual and offers positive strategies that enable children to deal with bullying. A de-brief session is offered after the play.

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Return of the Bully

At the end of the play BULLY NO MORE Becksy and Eric become friends but we don’t know what has happened to Becksy’s older brother Alex. In RETURN OF THE BULLY we find Alex is still bullying the other kids at school particularly the very popular Poppy whom he believes needs to come off her high horse. Poppy turns to her old friend and teacher Sensei who shows her the three secrets of the bully and the six strategies to deal with them. With this knowledge they decide that together they can stop the bully.
RETURN OF THE BULLY shows how you stop bullies without becoming a bully.

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The Bully is Back

During ‘The Bully is Back’ the principles of resilience are introduced to the children through the dramatisation of Alex’s return to the school. Poppy had been bullied by Alex in ’Return of the bully’ but this time she attempts to make friends and discovers all about Alex’s home life and how that has contributed to the bullying. Poppy asks sansei for help and he teaches her all about resilience. Sensei and Poppy decide to help Alex discover his resilience in times of adversity so that he doesn’t have to be a bully. The three sources of resilience I Have, I am and I Can are dramatised through the play’s story to encourage the children to foster trusting relationships, pride in oneself, the ability to problem solve and grow towards autonomous and independent behaviour.

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The Cyber Bully

Zoe and her cousin Edward have a lot of time on their hands. They are always online. One day Zoe discovers she can torment the girls she doesn’t like in her class using her favourite social networking sites and her mobile phone. She and Edward let loose thinking its harmless fun. Neither realises the impact of their actions. Things get a little crazy and Zoe starts suffering text-iety, post traumatic texting disorder not to mention post text depression. Eventually Edward and Zoe face the consequences of their actions.
The Cyber Bully is an entertaining play that explores the serious issue of cyber bullying among young people. The play looks at the misuse of texting, social networking sites and unauthorized use of pictures and footage. There will be a de-brief session offered after the performance where the actors will address important issues that are raised during the play and occur due to cyber bullying.

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Young Mary

St Mary MacKillop was determined, compassionate and steadfast even as a child. This play introduces us to Young Mary and we participate in her many fun filled and spirited childhood adventures. We have lots of fun playing games with Mary, and hearing about her pet cow Blorac and her dad Alexander. Then, as she grows, we bear witness to the determination of a hard working young woman who sets out to eliminate poverty and provide a fair education for all.
The play is funny and entertaining and involves the audience in lots of acting and moral decision making. Young Mary’s humour and compassion helps the audience enjoy and understand St Mary MacKillop, whilst appreciating her famous quote;
“Never see a need without doing something about it”.

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Catherine McAuley's Mercy

Sisters of Mercy all around the world draw inspiration from Catherine McAuley, who founded the Sisters of Mercy in Ireland in 1831. Catherine’s words – “It began with 2, Sister Doyle and I” – speak of the humble beginning to what has now become an international association of Sisters of Mercy. The play explores Catherine McAuley’s determination – political, practical and spiritual – to fulfil her dream of educating the poor, in particular women and girls. Catherine McAuley had a strong and dynamic character as well as a disarming Irish humour to help her through the trials that came her way. Will you tell the Sisters to get a good cup of tea…when I am gone and to comfort one another. – Letter of Mary Vincent Whitty to Cecilia Marmion in Sullivan, Catherine McAuley and the Tradition of Mercy, p. 243

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